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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
. what is the most constructive, definitive thing that america's lawmakers can now do? >> you know, there is no single, simple solution. it has to be a multifaceted approach beginning with a ban on assault weapons, stopping high capacity magazines, better background checks. right now 40% of all sales of guns in the united states involve no background check and better, more come premen hen sif checks as well as mental health prevention and outreach programs and, of course, better enforcement of all of these laws. not just existing laws but more supporting resources for the atf and local and state police that have the responsibility to protect our children. >> i have been stunned by the sheer political cowardness of so many politicians in america who seem just terrified of saying anything that the nra may object to. the nra has four million members. american has 10 billion people living here. i just don't understand why everybody is so coward about publicly debating this and trying to get the measures in place that you've just suggested. >> i think there really has been a seismic cha
, definitive thing that america's lawmakers can now do? or my -- my little boy is going to come back to me and i'm never going to have him again and -- but at least i can look at it that way and see the real meaning of christmas this year. >> neil, i'm at a bit of a loss of what to say to you. you've shown such extraordinary dignity and compassion in this interview and i've got three sons. i can't even imagine the hell of what you're going through and the way that you've spoken about it all shows such dignity on your part and i just want to thank you for that and to wish you all the very best as you try and rebuild your life from what's happened and jesse sounds like a remarkable young man. >> it's going to be a big change and a big adjustment next year. but i hope we can all focus on making it a positive one and making sandy hook a happy place like it was. the way i could describe that school, it was like mayberry, going there in the morning and dropping your children off and seeing the other parents. it was just happy. everybody was happy. the teachers, the staff, the children. and it's
to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. >>> growing unrest in egypt as protesters and police clash at the president palace in cairo. these images, these pictures are very powerful. >> the video we've been seeing is amazing. egyptians protesting president morsi broke through barbed wire at the palace and threw chairs and rocks at police, who in turn tossed tear gas into the crowd. the health ministry says 50 ambulances have been sent throughout cairo where hospitals are on high alert. the protests come as egyptians count down to a public referendum on a new constitution. much more to come on that. >>> in south carolina, parents who camped out for days to get first choice where they kids go to school found themselves in a stampede. thousands raced to get in line. one parent was injur
america for years to come. for that, we need a dea to avertthe fiscal cliff. let me know what you think. you can find me on facebook or tweet me. my handle is @ali velshi. have a great weekend. >>> you're in the "cnn newsroom." i'm joe johns. fredricka whitfield is off. u.s. investigators are looking into whether a man detained in egypt played a role in the attacks on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. egyptian authorities have detained muhammad abu ahmed. he's a well known jihadist who was released from prison after the downfall of former president hosni mubarak's regime.diotti i york. what do we know about the arrest of the aleng ledged terrorist suspect? >> he was picked up a couple weeks ago in ejimegyegypt. joous authorities suspect he may have been involved in the consulate attack in benghazi on september 11th that killed chris stephens and three other americans with direct knowledge of the investigation. the u.s. source tells me the fbi which is conducting the investigation, has not had access to him yet. the source says following the attack, ahmed very quickly popped up on their ra
will be the last political victim of the fallout. >> is this a loss for america? the people generally think susan rice would have made a good secretary of state? >> people have very different opinions on her. the acrimony that accompanied the attacks is not something many people will welcome. this is not how politics should be conducted in washington. also, the president said the attacks against her had been unfair. she was also being pilloried in the american media by some of her colleagues for being undiplomatic. a lot of people thought she would not have made a good secretary of state. we will never find out. she has done the gracious thing and about out of the race before president obama had to make a decision about whether or not to appoint her. that is not to say she will not get any position in the next administration. she could get a position that does not require congressional confirmation >> is there anyone who he was not spying for? the former russian agent who was poisoned to death six years ago was actually working for both the british and spanish intelligence services of the time of
are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of kennedys, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and trying to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them, what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about
you send a kleenex® care pack, complete with america's softest tissue, you're also giving a warm gesture of care. kleenex®. america's softest tissue. you're also giving a warm gesture of care. and eddy said the toys nimight not be ready!mas eddy? the elf! ♪ [ radio announcer ] today's forecast: it's snowing snowballs and snow bricks out there... seven more days and it's snowing snow bricks! oh, well, be careful! [ radio announcer ] only two days to go, and several of the elves were tossed around when they tried to wrap a pony. [ female announcer ] the keepsake countdown ornament. build anticipation every day till christmas. elves tried to wrap a pony! [ female announcer ] kay jewelers presents neil lane designs. from hollywood's premier jewelry designer. hand-crafted diamond rings, earrings and necklaces. at kay, the number-one jewelry store in america. ♪ every kiss begins with kay . >>> yesterday we showed you a very controversial page showing a new york subway train about to run someone over. >> this morning people are her an >> your realtime captioner: linda marie macdona
. >> also in washington, washington anchor for "bbc world news america" katty kay. >> no pieces, sorry. >> you'll write one next time. thank you. so we've got a lot to get to this morning. >> a lot to talk about today. >> those exceptions, what are you talking about? >> just in the conversation about everything you thought there were two exceptions. >> rick perry, governor of texas, and -- >> is it bob -- >> they said we need to -- we need to arm teachers. >> we have to think about it. >> somebody in the school with a gun. >> guns in school. that's great. you know what? this gelts me thinking, right? >> really? >> so that's what we're going to take care of last friday. so the shooting in the mall in oregon. >> yeah. >> i'm thinking maybe if we arm like the people that do the smoothies and whatever. >> or the sun glaglass hut thea or movie theater, the kid that give you popcorn. >> spencer's gifts. okay that doesn't make a lot of sense. >> that's an answer. come on. by the way, bock b mcdonald, a i like and respect, bob mcdonald -- i like him and agree with him 90% of the time. on this
. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at all. the other difficult thing about writing about more recent past is it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it, to construct a pass that is so close to them. and yet, this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify cavity mythologize, move beyond clichÉs about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historian, when grounded, delays of joseph p. kennedy whispered me a surrogate antique
approval. very different and just the same as america's favorite fish dinner. >> same texture. >> eating frankenfish. >> please don't use that term. >> reporter: the fda won't say when it will give final approval. the company says it could go out of business before it does. jim avila, abc news, washington. >> and they'll run out of money soon, in january of next year. >> a month. >> a matter of weeks from now too. the fda taking its time in getting to the issue. i think most people are at home going ew. >> i don't have a problem necessarily with steroid being injected into the chicken to make them larger. there's a reason that animals were created and supposed to stay exactly how they are. no cross-pollination here. interesting, little chance a salmon could escape and breed. if that happens, bred with wild fish they could disrupt everything. but there's -- >>> if the frankenfish got together with other fish. freaky fish! >> chaos. a freak every now and then. i knew willis would enjoy that. >>> still to come, getting ready for the end of the world. >>> as the countdown to the end of the m
. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. than a whole box of this other stuff... and that much freshness is gonna take some getting used to... [ sniffing ] yep. it's amazing what a single scoop of gain freshness can do. >>> welcome back, everybody. a comprehensive report about cancer risks stemming from exposure to the post 9/11 world trade center site seems to ask more questions than it actually answers. the study by new york city's health department suggests possible links with prostate, thyroid and a type of blood cancer, as well. but finds relatively few cancer cases among the nearly 56,000 folks who were studied. even the head of the study says the results "should be interpreted with caution." >>> more than a dozen fraternity members surrende
guest: we were in the war. whether clutch came or not america was rages against the japanese, not the germans. the first week pearl harbor. then hitler made the decision to declare war on the united states when he didn't have to and that, churchill realized, meant the end for hitler if the americans went to europe first. the policy of germany first then japan had to be worked out. which is why churchill was in washington that month. i think americans always liked churchill. he had been speaking in america for 20 years. was american. guest: his mother was american. he was well known on the lecture circuit and now here he is as prime minister. they were familiar with him. i think he came out of that speech that day knowing he had an ally and americans took a liking to him because they were very wary of churchill that all he wanted were his colonies become. b not liberty or not roosevelt's four freedoms but to recapture everything the japanese had taken from him by using american boys and that americans resented and they were wary of that host: we are about out of time. when di
and people and places. which organized and arranged 20th century america. joseph kennedy was a invalid type figure. he was everywhere. he was born in 1888. he lived through world war i. the 120s. he lived in hollywood at the moment of transition from silent films to talking films. he was on wall street during the boom and bust. he worked as part of the franklin roosevelt campaign team. he was the first chairman of securities and exchange commission and the maritime commission and the first irish-american to be ambassador for the court of st. james to great britain. he was also the father of the president and attorney general. a senator and the woman who did more for the mentally disabled in this country and this world than anyone else. a woman who will be as well known as her brothers, i think. the youngest to, the ambassador to ireland, jean kennedy smith, who was essential enraging piece. and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in the united states senate. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of the man who spent his life moving back and forth from outside
to share all across america. >> reporter: of course the president's allies have been saying that jim demint and some of his conservative allies who have not given on increasing tax rates. demint and his colleagues would say it's the president not putting enough spending cuts on the table stok focusing instead on tax hikes. that's why we're at this place where we are at a stalemate. jaime: time is running out. there is so little time left. what is the chance the president does go back to washington to get back to it? >> reporter: i think it's a very high chance. if you think back to last friday in the white house briefing room the president said, look we have to get a little pause, a little time out here, it is christmas, lawmakers want to go home, he wanted to come back here to hawaii with his family. he joked about having a little eggnog, have some christmas cookies, sing some carols, then he said i'll see you next week. when you talk to the president's aides it's very, very likely that by the end of this week he'll be tphroeug o flying on air force one back to washington, bringing the con
,000 deaths, gun-related deaths a year in america. no single law is going to stop all of those. but if we can cut it in half, or cut it by 20%, or even cut it by a tenth, that's still thousands of lives. and maybe we wouldn't have some of those horrible images as we see right now, these children being buried. >> schieffer: i think we reestablished communications with texas. senator hutch son, you were talking about you do suggest, at least schools being able to put police in schools if they think it's needed. but how about some of these other things? what about this idea of a ban on assault weapons? what about, as senator warn ser talking about, restricting the sales of these magazines that have 30 rounds in a clip? how do you feel about that? >> you know, i think we ought to be looking at where the real danger is, like those large clips. i think that does need to be looked at. we do have a ban on assault weapons, as was stated earlier. but it's the semiautomatic, and those large magazines that can be fired off very quickly. you do have to pull the trigger each time, but it's very quick. i th
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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